North Macedonia 2020

Join us once again for our annual European Conference. Our hosts will be the Student chapter in Skopje. 2 to 5 September:

SKOPJE – the capital city of Macedonia 

Skopje is the capital of the Republic of Macedonia, the City that lies in the heart of the Balkan Peninsula, at the crossroad of important communications, a city with a 2000 years old tradition. Skopje is a modern city with a population of almost one million and presents Macedonia’s major political, economical, educational and cultural center. It continues to be a focus for new residents, economic development, construction and refurbishment. Skopje urban area extends across the Skopje valley for approximately 30 kilometers (18.75 mi) in width and comprises 10 municipalities.

Skopje also is a very attractive tourist destination with its fortress, cultural and historical monuments, archaeological sites, sports halls, caves in the canyon of the River Treska and Lake Matka and a health spa in the eastern part of the city.
Read more>

History and culture 
In its 2,500 years of existence, Macedonia’s welcoming capital city has had many different embodiments. All of them – from Roman to Byzantine, from Ottoman to Yugoslav – have left permanent traces on the city as is evidenced by Skopje’s varied architecture and its mix of cultures. Yet in addition to its strong historical associations, Skopje is a forward-looking city offering an abundance of modern amenities and attractions. Apart from being the capital of the modern Republic of Macedonia, Skopje has always been a center of power yearned for by various empires. Situated on the banks of the River Vardar, a vital trade route is being founded by the Dardanians in the 3rd c. B.C known as “Skupi”, a much-prized city for its strategic location. When the Romans ruled, Skopje was made the administrative center of the Dardanian Province.

Places to visit
The Old Bazaar falls within the borders of Centar and Čair municipalities and is a protected national landmark.The earliest known documented sources that point out to the existence of a merchant quarter on the bazaar’s territory date back to the 12th century. During the Ottoman rule with the city, the place underwent a rapid development to become city’s main economic and merchant centre, evidenced by about 30 mosques, numerous caravanserais and hans, as well as other Ottoman buildings and monuments. The bazaar was heavily damaged by the earthquakes that occurred in 1555 and 1963, and the destructions caused during the First and the Second World War. Subsequently, it was reconstructed on several occasions and nowadays represents the only remaining cultural monument in the Republic of Macedonia, which has kept its multicultural heritage of different civilizations.
More places to visit here>

Peace through Understanding in a name change
In the Republic of North Macedonia, many people still trip over their tongues, trying to get used to what they must now call their country>

A post-conference tour will take place in the beautiful cities of Kratovo, Ohrid and Struga from 6 to 9 September. 

twitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Copyright © 2019 PTPI.eu | All Rights Reserved | Privacy